Films

Films

The revolution introduced me to art, and art, in its own turn, brought me to the revolution.

Sergei Eisenstein

Top ten films, ten noble efforts, and five turkeys for Christmas, 2017.
Thursday, 14 December 2017 22:41

Top ten films, ten noble efforts, and five turkeys for Christmas, 2017.

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Dennis Broe introduces his top ten films, ten noble efforts, and a few duds from 2017. First a caveat. My filmgoing is in Europe so there are some fluctuations in openings between the American and European markets. So Moonlight, for example, last year’s Oscar winner, is on my list for this…
The Death of Stalin
Saturday, 28 October 2017 16:39

The Death of Stalin

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Gerry Rowe is disappointed by The Death of Stalin. In Andy Hamilton and Guy Jenkin’s ‘Drop the Dead Donkey’, the object of satire is a thoroughly British media company owned by equally feared and reviled tycoon Royston Merchant, never himself seen on screen. Who in their right, lefty mind wouldn’t…
The Shape of Water
K2_PUBLISHED_ON Tuesday, 19 September 2017 07:59

Venice Film Festival 2017: Part Two

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Dennis Broe, on the World Film Beat, gives a windup report from the Venice Film Festival. This was truly a festival that had something for everyone with its top prize, which coincides with my top film, going to Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water, making it by far the frontrunner…
Dunkirk: Keep Calm and Carry On?
K2_PUBLISHED_ON Friday, 25 August 2017 07:37

Dunkirk: Keep Calm and Carry On?

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Daniel Clarkson Fisher reviews Christopher Nolan's Dunkirk, and discusses the moral obligations of the artist, the WW2 combat genre, and the potential for a 'truly radical flowering' of progressive film culture. In keeping with his penchant for enormity, Christopher Nolan’s new film Dunkirk arrives at the intersection of two large…
Dunkirk - a visceral account of the Allied retreat
K2_PUBLISHED_ON Monday, 14 August 2017 11:17

Dunkirk - a visceral account of the Allied retreat

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Michael Roberts reviews the recently released Dunkirk. Taught to children in schools up and down the country, the evacuation of Dunkirk is ingrained into the very culture of Great Britain. Images, paintings and newspaper clippings which tell the story of 400,000 British troops attempting to retreat from France with the…
Wonder Woman: a feminist anti-war fable?
Sunday, 09 July 2017 06:00

Wonder Woman: a feminist anti-war fable?

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Feminist anti-war fable, or just another piece of cinematic propaganda enlisting feminism to sustain violent imperialism? Dennis Broe reviews the newly-released Wonder Woman.  'Pure entertainment' is the handle of one twitter hashtag about the film which is now on its way to grossing 600 million worldwide, and is being hailed…
Kino eye two
Monday, 26 June 2017 19:49

'The most important of the arts': film after the Russian Revolution

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John Green outlines the role of film in the Bolshevik Revolution, and the profound and lasting influence of Russian revolutionary film-makers on cinema not only in the Soviet Union but across the world. According to the Bolshevik government’s first Commissar for Education, Anatoly Lunacharsky, Lenin remarked that, ‘Film for us…
Not the Feelies
Thursday, 22 June 2017 19:50

Not the Feelies

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Jenny Farrell explains how Leviathan reveals the nature of capitalism. The dystopias of the mid-20th century, Brave New World (1932) and Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949), described with astonishing accuracy the world we live in today: thought police, news speak, genetic engineering, escapist drugs and a cinema that conditions people not to…
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